Flickr in Trouble?

FlickrCameraI was browsing through the blogs I follow and saw a post about trouble in Flickr land.  So I hopped on over to Flickr to find out what’s going on.

I have a love/hate relationship with Flickr.  I’ve always hated Yahoo, and when they owned Flickr, I was very hesitant to sign up, especially since they required a phone number.  I finally bit the bullet and signed up.

Then a year or so ago, SmugMug bought Flickr.  Yay! Because then I wouldn’t have to deal with Yahoo.  Or so I thought.  I missed the window to migrate off of my Yahoo account and I still haven’t gotten around to changing it.

Now, it appears that the old saying is true – There’s no such thing as a free lunch.

I wish my kids understood this.  They are GenZ’ers – or the iGen as they are sometimes called.  They think there’s an app for everything – a FREE app.  And if there isn’t, there should be.  I’ve explained about the costs of running a business and the perils of handing over your personal data just to get a free app, but most of the time it falls on deaf ears.

Anyway, it appears SmugMug has discovered that, while people love Flickr, lots of people don’t want to pay for it.  Which, understandably, makes it difficult to keep Flickr afloat.  When SmugMug initially bought Flickr, they made some changes, which included that free account holders would be limited in the number of photos they could upload.

Fine with me – I just deleted a bunch of old photos to put myself under the limit.  I keep all my photos saved on my own external hard drive anyway, so it wasn’t like I was losing anything.  Since I’ve not been in-world as much, I haven’t had as many photos to upload anyway.

I do understand SmugMug’s dilemma.  They want to keep Flickr going, but it takes time and effort and money to do that.  I’m just not sure I use Flickr enough to justify paying for the service.  I am naturally resistant to subscription services – I don’t use Netflix, Hulu, Spotify, Adobe CC, or anything like that.  If I want something, I want to purchase it, own it, hold it in my hot little hands.  Which is why I’m still using my Photoshop CS6 – the last version you could purchase.

It remains to be seen whether Flickr manages to convince enough people to purchase Pro subscriptions to keep it afloat.

SL Go Fail?

Image Source:  modemworld.wordpress.com
Image Source: modemworld.wordpress.com

I’ve blogged before about the SL Go service from OnLive.

I don’t have a super high-end computer and I was curious whether the service would be worth the price of the subscription ($10USD/month).

After using it, I have decided to keep up my subscription.  My original intention was to use it for taking super awesome pics with shadows and everything, which I don’t run on my PC.

However, it doesn’t quite work the way I thought it would.

And apparently others have thought so as well.

Whitney Blackburn tried it out and didn’t have a great experience with it.  See her blog post here.

I had some of the same issues.  I use a PC with a big monitor and I find that when I am using SL Go, it tends to be blurry and out of focus, especially text.  So chatting can become a challenge.

I also found it kind of dark and tried various ways to lighten it up without much success.

For landscape photography and avatar portraits, I will definitely use SL Go.

But for dance shows, I will stick to my PC.  The pics I took with SL Go at the last show I attended came out dark and kind of blurry, and I much preferred how the ones I took with my PC looked.

So, for many, SL Go may not be the way to go.

However, if you have an old PC or want to run SL on your tablet or iPad, it’s a wonderful option.

Have you tried SL Go?  What do you think of it?

SL Go Update

I wrote a post about the new service from OnLive, called SL Go.  I was excited to try it out, because it’s supposed to let you run SL at Ultra settings even on old computers.

However, as of now, I haven’t tried it out.  I had a bit of trouble understanding the steps I needed to go through to get SL Go to work on my PC (because it’s mainly aimed at smartphone and tablet users).  So when my tech-savvy husband got home, I had him try to install it on our tablet so we could use the 20-minute free trial and see whether or not we liked it enough to pay for the service.

I wanted to try it out to see whether I could use SL Go instead of upgrading to a more expensive graphics card.  I thought my husband would like it, because he prefers to do everything on his phone or tablet, even if a laptop or PC is available.

Anyhoo, we got as far as installing the SL Go app and setting up an account with OnLive.  BUT – it would not let us begin using the free 20-minute trial unless we entered our credit card information.  Maybe I’m old-fashioned, but I don’t like just handing out my credit card info to anyone, especially when they don’t really need it.  If it’s a free trial, why do they HAVE to have my credit info?  I just wanted to try it out, and then if I liked it, sign up for the paying service.  If I don’t, then I just walk away.

At this point, regardless of how ‘amazing’ the app is, I won’t be using it.  I’m not going to be bullied into providing information that they don’t need.  The SL Go is either a monthly subscription or a ‘buy a chunk of time’ option.  So since you can buy, say, an hour of time for the app, I would assume that they have the capability to shut down/kick you out/log you off the app when the time you’ve paid for is up.  So why exactly do they NEED my credit information for me to use their ‘free trial’?

From a consumer standpoint, it doesn’t make sense to me.