Tutorial #4: The Artiste Palette

PaletteImage

What is it?

The Artiste Palette, simply stated, is a unique concept, and methodology for “extending” the reach and ability of the Artiste Performance HUD.

It came into being after satisfying multiple requests to friends for special one-time scripts to do this and special one-time scripts to do that. I simply gathered up all th contrubitions that myself and Jemma, a fellow scriptor, have provided over the years, and then added what i felt was a full compliment of anything else that people might and would ask for in the future. Everything except the kitchen sink.

===========================
Inside a Palette

As of this writing, it is comprised of 10 scripts, (2 of them optional), and 5 notecards (3 of them optional).  Anything that is modifiable can be a Palette. Just copy the scripts and notecards into its root prim.  Special handling and consideration should be taken when turning a multi-prim object into a Palette.

===========================
Friends

So imagine that you know you could accomplish a special task if only you knew how to script, but you cannot script yourself. So you go to a friend and ask them to script the solution for you. And then you ask another friend the next time. Then you ask friends if they have a script to do such-and-such.

And you really want it to perform a little bit different than the last time you used it but you don’t know how to modify it so you try and find someone to modify it . You may find someone or you give up and ‘settle’ for how it works.

The Palette was created to address people who have ‘imagined needs’ that are able to ‘follow a recipe of instructions’ and can edit a notecard.

It requires attention to ‘sets of instructions’ and an ability or determination to find and fix typos.

===========================
Illustrated Manual

There is a 70-plus-page illustrated intellibook on the features of the Palette. You learn how to ‘make it do stuff‘ by changing parameters on the 5 notecards.

The 5 notecards inside of the Palette tell it “what” it can do and become.

The instructions you write on 2 notecards in the HUD tell it “when” to execute.

===========================
Horizontal vs. Vertical Thinking

Up until now, you may have had a tool that does cool things and may specialize in a few cool things. And once you learned how to make it do a cool thing, you made it to that same cool thing many times. The more times you made it do that same thing, the better and more able and proficient you felt. I compare that to “vertical” creation.

The Artiste focuses on “horizontal” creation. The goal is to do many different things one time each. Like adding more colors to a graduating from black-and-white to color. The more colors, used creatively, the more vibrant is the creative expression.

I don’t posit it as ‘better than’, just a different approach, an additonal choice, an extra tool in your tool-box,  that offers more variety and options and allows one’s creativity to ‘stand-alone’. Once you have become adept at vertical-creation, horizontal-creation may be a logical next step to unleash your more of your creative energies.

==================
Compound vs Complex

The Palette lends it self to compound as well as complex construction.

Compound means that it can be “more than one thing at the” same time’. You saw an example of that in the beginning  State-Of-Shock video State-Of-Shock video when it shows one Palette serving as a “mover” a “light”, and an “animated texture”. It had to be first imagined that combining them would produce a desired result.

As of this writing, there are in excess of  80 “things that a Palette can become and/or do”. I call them “action-features”.

Complex means that when 2 ‘action-features’ happen in succession and careful order of executio, they tell a mini-story by their very association an. I present 2 examples.

1st example: Letters From the Sky

At the beginning of this video, Aura falls over backwards over a cliff and then continues to fall down a cliff. Those are 2 different action-features, tip and move of the Palette that occur 1 after the other. They convey a mini-story when presented in close proximity to one another. But it had to be ‘imagined first’. The Palette does not come with pre-ordered sets of compound creations.

2nd example: Stink

Here is an idea I had and then implemented it. A foul odor in a room that i want to get rid of. The window opens and the stink exits the room thru the window, changing its color as it does to imply its composition is affected by the onset of fresh-air. It is, again, a one-after-the-other sequence of 2 actions, that tells a mini-story, that of clearing a room of an undesired odor.  By themselves the 2 events, window opening and stink moving don’t say as much as the 2 together.

I am suggestiong that the constant presence of the 80+ action-features AND your ability to make your own personal adjustments helps empower you to create using manageable building blocks.
You can change not just the color of the stink dynamically but also any other particle-parameter(s).  And I even provide the notecards I used to  create this mini-story. This is how many unique mini-stories still to be told. 7.156946e+118  (over ‘7 followed by 119 zeros’) using the Artiste system.

The window is just one of 50 easily-controllable binary-state objects that come as part of a complimentary package I call Set-Responders. (There is an additional charge for this package and is not part of any Artiste offering). You can of course find your own very inexpensive or free binary-state items that accept chat commands and then substiture appropriately.

===============
Customizable

It is important to note that the action-features are not static. Each has been intimately addressed as to how best to offer adjustable notecard-parameters to change and expand its behavior and presentation.

==================
Owning It

With the adoption of the Artiste Palette, you would transition from “No big, deal. I can do that too” …to…”I did this, my own creation that I had personally not seen done before”.

Enjoy the experience of peers and/or audience members coming up to you asking you ‘How did you do that?” Or all of a sudden seeing a lot of copycatting of your invention.

I think the fact that the 80+ action-features, plus the dozen or so Palette abilities, which I have not discussed yet, plus the several HUD functions, all in combination and ever-present in your face, constantly remind you of what different mixture of Artiste-colors you can blend either in a compound or complex way or combinations of the both.

What is a Palette Ability?

There are currently 15 abilities. Abilities are like light-switches either on or off. If off, then action-features requirding it cannot be performed. Example: A palette cannot be a mover if the ability “moveable” is not on, even though it has all the moves defined. They help narrow or filter what a Palette can and cannot do or be as well as help limit interference.

Well you have already glimpsed at some of them:
You know about:

Moveable (State-Of-Shock)
Texturable (State-Of-Shock)
Lightable (State-Of-Shock)
Sittable (State-Of-Shock)

Animatable (State-Of-Shock)
Throwable
(State-Of-Shock ending)
Particles (State-Of-Shock ending)
Collidable (State-Of-Shock ending)
Attachable (State-Of-Shock ending)

So you now already know half of them and probably how they were applied.

===================
Imagine Then Do

It is like seeing a random spread of scrabble letters and imagining what words you can make from the letters. Letters in close proximity to each other give you clues as to what words can be made. The Artiste is like that cause you are always seeing letters that could make up words.

====================

And so lastly I will list some of the features of the action-features of the Palette, many of which you have seen in action:

Object Mover
Avatar Mover
Thrower
– Throw, catch, roll, drop, dribble, boomerang, sail,
ricochet, matrix, stop-motion, kick, and more
While the thrower is briefly covered in the Palette book, it is so
intricate and advanced that it has its own 50-page book.

Animated Texture – (you can start and stop as well as animate for a set
number of times)

Tip
Fader – (many customizable controls)
Oscillator
Collider
Rezzer
Die
Light
Sit-2-Sit
– Palette Transfer
FollowSpot
Glow
Control

Particles
Flash

————————
I hope this tutorial on the Artiste Palette and the previous tutorial on the Artiste Performance HUD will help you make a more informed decision on whether or not to adopt one of the reduced-price package offerings good thru the month of December 2015.

In case you missed the prior tutorials, here are convenient links:

Tutorial #1

Tutorial #2

Tutorial #3

Lat “Yummy” Lovenkraft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tutorial #3: The Artiste Performance HUD

The Artiste Performance HUD is the centerpiece of the Artiste Performance Suite. Let us familiarize with some of its basics.

The HUD “functions”.

On the face of the HUD are buttons that can toggle red and green
except for the yellow button that does not toggle. It is always
active. Clickin the yellow button brings up a menu.

The purpose of the buttons, that represent the primary “functions”
of the Artiste, is to be able to jointly test different combinations of funtionality while at the same time excluding other functionality.

The idea being to simplify creation and testing scenarious by temporarily
suppressing functionaly that might other wise muddle the waters, so to speak.

Once you have an area of functionaly tested, then suppress it by toggling it RED.

Now focus on a new area.

To start the HUD playing all of your “enabled functional instructions“,  press the GREEN PLAY button that looks like a triangle pointing right.

To stop the HUD from playing your set of instructions prior to it reaching its normal end, press the RED SQUARE button.

Play and Stop Buttons

 

Artiste Primary Functions

The Functions are now listed with the most used functions at the top.

1 – AutoFX – This function essentially allows you to control devices that are ‘external’ to the HUD. It uses chat commands to start, modify, and stop various devices, the most prevalanet being the Artiste Palette. This is the most used notecard because if its wide flexibility.

There is a nc called *autofx. Each line on it corresponds to 1 of 20 events or points in time after pressing start that you want to be able to specify 1 or more funtions to occur. More about events in a  subsequent tutorial.

And you can have multiple actions on a given line. So you can instruct multiple actions to have for a given event, limited to 255 characters.

External devices other than the Artiste Palette include but are not limited to: Artise Camera Controller, Artiste Curtain, Artiste DanceDiva, Artiste SetRezzer, and devices made by other creators that accept chat control.

Unlike most systems that exclusively communicate via chat-channel numbers, the Artiste HUD communicates  not only via channel numbers but ‘names‘ at certain situations for easier identification.

2 – AutoSequence – This controls wether you will be dancing animation sequences.  There are 2 ways to ‘dance’. Immediately upon pressing PLAY. This is handy when you want to start dancing when you first hear music.
The other is to start a sequence playing in sync with one of the 20 events that you will define. The Artiste allows for up to 4 sequences per HUD. Each Sequence can have 1 or more animations in it.

One important attribute of a sequence of animations is the ability to instruct one or more Palettes to ‘do something‘, moving being just one of the things you could tell a Palette to do. Just like an animation, you tell it how long you want it to perform it before continuing to the next
animation. This allows you to easily synchronize Palette features to occur at precise moments just before or after a given animation.

3 – AutoAdorn – This is the function used to add props, make props appear attached, to the HUD wearer. There is now also a ‘negative adorn‘ which allows for the removal of a prop. This can also apply to a layer of clothing.

And a new feature is the Adorn Swap that allows for a simultaneous exchange of props attached to 2 different body parts. This is how a Hat-from-Head-to-Hand or Hat-in-Hand-to-Head can be more easily performed in one command rather than using an add and a remove.

There is now some overlap in functionality between AutoAdorn and AutoStrip. But this flexibility allows ways for you get out of tight jams.
Giving you extra events to accomplish prop/clothing removal.
AutoAdorn also has the ability to occur at a given offset in time to an event as opposed to
exactly on the event. This has proven invaluable in tight-timing-synchronization situations.

4 – AutoStrip – The Artiste started out solely as a tool to aid burlesque dancers in helping to streamline the process of removing items of clothing so a lot of work has been put into this one area. There is aA lot of flexiblity.

AutoStrip allows for the removal of layers of clothing or attachments …either a single layer or attachment from several layers or attachments to the same body part…or ALL layers and attachments for a given body part.

It is one of few areas that can work manually as well as sequenced.
The Standard A-250 package comes with 25 NOCOPY but TRANSFER/MOD FREE relays. These are to be worn by members in group performances so performers can perform functions in sync with each other  like Adorning, Negative-Adorning, Stripping, Swapping, etc.

5 – AutoEmote – this function is pretty straight forward. You control whether the HUD will send emotes to local chat. You caan also send the HUD wearer ‘warnings’. Other options include name spoofing. You are allowed 1 emote per event for a maximum of about 20 emotes per HUD, using just AutoEmote. Recently we enabled AutoAnnounce to also produce emotes in local chat, so now yo have an additional 20 for a total of 40 chat lines per HUD. And on top of that, if that is not enough, since AutoEmote and AutoAnnounce are tied to events….Palettes can produce local chat emotes…So essentially an unlimited amount of chats per HUD.

And is Palette-based emoting is over-bearing for you, there is HUD chaining to more easily extend 40 chats with another 40.  40 for each new chained HUD.

And yes you can use /ME in your chat line There is also an entry that simultaneously delivers a chat to a chat-extender or shouter on a channel you choose.

=================================

What has been presented is a lot to absorb for those new to the Artiste so I will cut this tutorial short. I will briefly identify the other areas but not in as much depth.

6 – AutoChange – this is for outfit/costume changes

7 – AutoAccess – this was born from the need to quickly get to and control common show-time functions like: Curtain Open/Close, logging in and out,  showing and hiding palettes, hovertext control on palettes, group-dance assignments, dance invites, resetting of palettes, homing them, etc

One in-demand feature is the ability to send ‘all sittable‘ palettes
to their 2nd move and then wait for the HUD-wearerto press PLAY. This allows for easy sending of people below stage or above stage or elsewhere hidden in preparation for actual show-start

8 – AutoAnnounce – much like AutoEmote, only it sends to a different channel

9 – AutoCam – controls automated controlled-camera viewing to the audience. There is Also has built-in StageSight that allows the HUD-wearer to quickly see the stage and themselves and/or group as the audience sees them and instant angle-change to the tipjar.

—————–

I hope this has shed enough light on most of the key functionality of the Artiste Performance HUD for those considering purchase. Up next will be a more in-depth look at what the Palette can do.

In case you missed the prior tutorials, here are convenient links:

Tutorial #1

Tutorial #2

Lat “Yummy” Lovenkraft

Tutorial #2 – Artiste Suite Overview

ArtisteSuiteOverview

Trying to wrap one’s mind around the Artiste can be challenging so hopefully this will help you see the bigger picture. The main 2 pieces to understand at this point is the Artiste Performance HUD and the Palette. Not listed in the chart, for brevity sake, are other entities like the Master Rezzer (for sets) and the Artiste Curtain, and something HUGE coming in 2016..

As you can see, the HUD can communicate to many entities, not the least of which is that it can communicate to another Artiste Performance HUD.
It has 2 ways to talk to itself. By loading another HUD and then waiting for the HUD wearer to tell the newly loaded HUD to run. Or…it can autorun the new HUD without any operator-interevention and then old HUD and deatch itself. We call this HUD-chaining.

ArtisteHUD_IMAGE

HUD-chaining allows for an infinite number of control stages when one runs out of HUD resources: like events, emotes, dances, etc. This is handy for those 1 hour-plus productions.

99%  of the time you can get by with extending a HUD’s capabilities by using one or more Palettes. While the HUD has about a dozen or more primary funtions, its abilities are extended to about 100 more what I call, action-features, by using a Palette.

PaletteImage

Think of a Palette as the friend or source you go to when you need a special script. Maybe a fader script, as an example. Well now you can bypass the friend and the need to acquire a script .

The Palette can be that fader, one of the 100 or so things it can be or do.

You no longer need to settle for a fader scripts fixed settings. You can customize your fader using the Palette notecards. Oscillation, transparency limits, intervals, single-shot (credit to little Zed from whom I got the idea) …to name a few.

——-

A Palette is copyable so you can have a HUD control more than 1 Palette.

A Palette can can control another Palette.

A Palette can create another Palette.

A Palette can communicate back to the HUD.

A Palette can talk to products from other creators.

Anything that is modifiable can be a Palette. It is not restricted to the object you get that is a single-prim box. No linking required although it is not prohibited from linking.

Many of you are now familiar  with movers. The Palette is what becomes a mover in the Artiste world. It can be an Object-Mover. It can be an Avatar-Mover.

The Artiste Palette can be a mover AND other things (if that is your choice)  at the same time. And you can tweak the characteristics of the ‘other things’ it can be.

Here is a link to a video where 12 Palettes are in use. I wish to to direct your attention to the opening. A Palette is: An avatar-mover AND an animated-texture AND an Artiste-Light.  Later on in this video, the same Palette-based-Avatar-Mover morphs into an Palette-based- Object-Mover and is instructed at precise times, from the HUD, to follow the moves of the animation. Insane. More crazy stuff happens near the end of the video but for now focus on its ability to: 1) behave like multiple items and 2) to change what it is and how it behaves dynamically. NOTE: A Palette as a mover can perform different selected ranges of moves from a given move-sequence and is not restricted to all-or-nothing execution of all-moves.

Credit to Aura Fitzgerald (auricrose Resident) for: Concept, Choreography, Design, and Execution

State-Of-Shock Video (compound Palette)

For a more in-depth analysis of the techniques, see this link:

State-Of-Shock (Behind the Scenes)

and scroll down to where it says: “STATE OF SHOCK –  Video  – Watch the video ==>

It goes without saying that this is an advanced adaptation of Artiste technology and not something one could expect to master over-night or even a few nights but it does show what is possible with “imagination” and perserverance married with technological innovation.

—-

One person told me after hearing of the wide berth of offerings, “wow, you’d better have good support“.

That is an understatement with the weight of this offering. Thats why support doesnt end with a website, manuals, and videos.  So very key is ‘attitude‘. So very key is ‘patience‘. So very key is ‘availability‘. As are ‘product knowledge‘ and ‘product experience‘.

You will ask what you feel are stupid questions. Its ok. Not to me. Fine by me. Used to it. There are no stupid questions because that is the state of a new person learning.

You may ask the same question over and over. Its ok. Fine by me. I am us used to it.  I will answer you again.

In fact, I dont feel users elicit personal one-on-one help often enough. It is often pride or fear of feeling stupid or a determination to figure things out on their own. But this can lead to wasteful hours especially if its a simple thing like a typo, systax, or a rule they may be unaware of. I have seen and solved so many issues. Even issues that are not the fault of the Artiste but are an anomaly of SL. I still try to offer a solution. Quite a few Artiste abilities are the result of overcoming SL limitations and anomalies. I go out of my way not rely on “It’s SL, live with it”.

And yes, sometimes you will be doing everything right and its really a bug. That’s why its important not to ‘beat yourself up’ needlessly. I am very attentive to fixing bugs and 95% are solved same day, Often within the 1st hour.

And the best time to ask questions is in the beginning when you are trying to get a foothold and gain confidence.

You can ask anything you want in group from other users. I encourage people helping people. Our users are very eager to lend assistance.

 

I will keep this 2nd in a series of tutorials short and brief and let this material sink in. Hope you gained some insight.

Lat “Yummy” Lovenkraft

P.S.

I don’t want to overwhelm people with a myriad of information about the Artiste. The purpose of the tutorial series is to deliver byte-sized and digestable portions of information and ease people into the Artiste. But at the suggestion of a few others,  I will provide a link to our blog-site that has more information, however I would hope you would try your best to hold off going there unless you are unable to contain your curiosity.

The Artiste Blogsite

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tutorial #1: Introduction to the Artiste Performance HUD & Suite for Non-Owners

Artiste top banner GOLD V2.1

Attitudes seem to be changing about the Artiste or maybe attitudes towards interest in ‘new dance-community technology’. There was a time when few knew or seemed to want to know about the Artiste or the applicability of modernized-dance-tools. I take partial responsibility because 1) its steep price-tag and 2) it not having a store presence or MP presence like my other products. However a store presence does not always insure a safety-blanket of support, as in the case of the Huddles and a few other dance HUDs. I have been in SL 8 years daily, missing only a few  days due to illness or internet availability. I am approachable, helpful, and very patient .

Due to its price and intricacy, it is preferred to have a short casual Q&A interview with prospective buyers to make sure the product has a fair chance to meet their expectations as opposed to people buying it off the shelf without having their questions  answered and have some confidence that their specific needs are cared for.

—-

Times have changed and people seem accustomed to a ‘process’ of using one or more tools, sometimes tools in concert with each other, to help aid in  presenting a cohesive and more professional solo or group stage performance.

Also there are so many new performers in SL that were not here a year or more ago so this is a good time to introduce the Artiste to the ‘new’ as well as reintroduce it to those who were or are vaguely familiar with it.

The goal is, of course, in presenting a comprehensive tool is to witness  and enable people to simply do cool, great, fun, and creative things via technological ingenuity!

I think there is currently an ongoing hunger for something new or a ‘next new(big?) thing’ as has been hinted in several interactions with people in the dance community.

Kat and I discussed what seemed to be a prevailing malaise of creative energy for many, but of course not everyone.

There are so many venues and so many acts and performers that there are a lot of recurring themes, sets, costumes, dances, songs…and all justifiable because they are learning firsts for those newcomers who have just as much right to travel down the roads of  discovery as their forebearers. It is hoped that a new tool might go a long ways to invigorating the creative process. I like to think of the Artiste as a tool able to help unleash the creative-centers  and amplify a person’s ideas to new heights and expanses. Something to kickstart one’s imagination.

We also shared the view that although new-technology is good and a timely ‘new shiny’, that without a passionate creative-center, few if any new cool-tools will make a person a ‘next performing-wonder’ nor bring a modicum of self-satisfaction.

And people also seem very amenable to learning new things as well as relearning what they think they already know, with the sudden explosion of training and classes on a wide variety of dance-related topics.

It seems the time is right for a ‘something else’. Not  necessarily a replacement but an adjunct to the tools one is already successful with.

Some have asked that I offer a class on Artiste along-side of other product offerings taught in classes that have been offered as well as future classes.

Others have offered to help teach the Artiste.

And more than a few people have suggested that I present an on-going digestible tutorial on the Artiste for non-owners who wonder what it is all about.

It appears all signs point to an emergence of information presented to help close the gap of knowledge about it.

And that is what this series of articles will be about. A presentation specially tailored for the non-owner of the Artiste.

So that means that it will be much less technical than previous offerings and more general.

================
PRODUCT PRICING

GREAT NEWS!

First let me announce that there are now 4 NEW price-tier offerings lest you turn off now due to its former prohibitive lofty single price tag. More than a few people have requested partial-product offerings.

A-50: 1 NOCOPY/NOTRANS/MOD HUD      5,000L
A-75: 1 NOCOPY/NOTRANS/MOD HUD & COPY/MOD Palette      7,500L
A-100: 2 NOCOPY/NOTRANS/MOD HUDs & COPY/MOD Palette  10,000L

A-250: The Standard Artiste Performer Series. 25,000 L

The A-50, A-75, and A-100 are only guaranteed valid From December 1st, 2015 thru December 31st, 2015.

I will expand on the differences in a subsequent post.

——-
NOTE: The Palette is required in order to create object-movers and avatar-movers as well as all of the special-extended show-effects.

PaletteImage

——-
The new pared-down package offerings are meant to be entry-level affordable and provide accessible and practical learning models. The HUDs and Palettes are fully functional and are not intentionally crippled in functionality. The Standard package may be more than what many people need. These product offerings allow people to ease-in to the Artiste mind-set.

You also get the same level of support, access to all information and educational sources including our: group, blog, website, classes, and unlimited one-on-one support.

All future upgrades are FREE.

And YES, what you pay for the 3 low-tier offerings are 100% applicable should you decide to upgrade to a higher tier-level at a later date. And YES, your upgrade offers survive the 2016 deadlin.e

==========================
Who is the Artiste targeted for?

1) Advanced Choreographers/Performers who are ready to take that ‘next step’. Those looking for ‘a next big thing’. Those who like to position themselves on a leading edge.

2) Those who are patient and determined

3) Those who are reasonably technically savvy.

4) I don’t recommend the Artiste to someone who has never used any dance-hud prior and/or never edited a note-card unless you are very tech-savvy and accustomed to picking up new technoligies with ease and acumen.

5) Those accustomed to scheduling their in-show activities to occur at specific pre-planned times. This means everything is sequenced.

==========================
The Artiste

Ok so what can be said about the Artiste to those new to it or unfamiliar that it even exists? The following descriptives come to mind:

————
HUD-Centric

It is an all-encompassing precision performance suite for burlesque and cabaret stage soloists and groups, the heart of which is the Artiste Performance HUD. The HUD tells the other parts of the suite what to do, how to do it, where to do it, and when to do it.

————
Features-List

The Artiste has an ungodly amount of features so I won’t even attempt to enumerate them as it would serve no good purpose now and likely do more harm than good.

I will attempt to highlight the most important and popular ones in coming tutorials.

The good news is you can do a lot with just a few features and pick and choose which of the various other features you want to focus your energies on.

Many are easy to use. You dont need to learn or master all of them or even most of them in order to find utility and usefulness from the product.

————
Analogies

The Artiste Suite can be likened to:

– a science laboratory kit-experimrent with mixing chemicals

– a Lego-kit, with the Palette likened to a transformer-toy that can be a say, a robot or car or weapon.

– an iceberg. Only maybe 25% of its capabilities have been tapped, 3/4ths of it abilites remain unchartered.

– the difference between power-steering and the gas pedal in car. Some tools you may be familiar and comfortable with you expend very little effort, comparatively speaking, and get a many times the results, albeit that you are not moving forward but side to side. The Artiste is like a gas pedal.. The more pressure you apply the faster it goes and the farther it goes …but you need to keep applying pressure to keep going.

————
Discovery

It is a discovery tool. You can make unique personal discoveries using imagination, experimentation, perseverance, and patience.

————
Identifying Strategy

You can combine more than 2 or more features to create a new hybrid feature.

By imaginative ordering of the execution of 2 or more features, you can also create dynamic run-time cause-and-effects. I will demonstrate in a subsequent tutorial.

————
Pre-Scheduler/Sequencer

While it does have some ‘press-this-button, make-this-happen-now‘ features it was engineered to pre-schedule a wide variety of activities in close coordination with one another. This is familiar with the way you sequence dances to occur one afte ther other by pressing a button. THe idea with Artiste is to sequence everything else as well, emotes, special-fx, outfit-modifications, etc.

To the dismay of some, it is not a primary-support-tool for those who like to dynamically make things happen during show-time, though there are some measures that can be taken to accomplish immediacy with some imaginative effort.

————
Reminder

It is an all-in-one-tool by choice. The reason being that from the layout of the HUD to the concept of ‘Palette abilities‘ to the simple long laundry list of features and Palette-Actions, it is meant to be a constant reminder of ‘other things it can do‘. Its ever-present array of offerings is meant to help stimulate you into being more creative.

————
Dedication

I strongly do not recommend it for someone ladened with having to put out 1 or more shows a week as others have fallen into the trap of thinking they can learn a cool new Artiste-technique and implement it in one weeks time ready for their upcoming show as an adjunct to what they were are already doing with other tools.

While it does have a history of playing well with some others, I would not expect to inject new coolness quickly. Allow time to learn and make way for typical growing pains. Give your self time for trial-and-error without the pressures of having to be productive almost over-night.  Patience.

————
Familiaity

You will find many things simple (emoting)…

..and familiar like the way an animation is identified:

Example:
name-of-animation1 | time
name-of-animation2 | time

————
Reliable Timing Engine

It has a pretty tight timing-engine that seems to perform consistently and reliably as you can see from some of the many show and demo videos. Many cool-things depend on reliable close-proximity-executions of various tasks in conjunction with one another.

————
Plays Well With Others

It has been show-tested to have worked successfully with some other popular tools.

————
Single-HUD Solution

One popular attraction is that those used to having a screen full of HUDs have found a lot of screen-space freed up because the Artiste presents as a one-HUD solution.

————
Optimized Work-Flow

Our note-cards are grouped into sections so you only ever reload just the section you’ve made changes to. (i.e. dances, emotes, stripping, outfit changes, special fx, etc). This provides for very fast reload work-flow as we call it. (reading the notecard info into the HUD.

————-
Selective Testing

Using the buttons on the HUD face you can enable and disable functions so that you confine your testing to a limited set of features at a time…allowing you to focus with simplification and isolation of functionality.

————
Time-Tested

The Artiste 5 years in the making.
The SILVER version, two-and-a-half years in test and live usage.
The GOLD version, just celebrated one-year live-usage.

————
Built-In Redundancy

Users have found there are usually multiple ways to accomplish a given task or challenge which provides for flexibility when you run into a dead-end.

————
Challenge

The Artiste is an advanced-performance-tool ideal for those who are
ready to ‘push boundaries‘ to paraphrase how Kat has characterized it.

It reportedly has a steep learning curve and I won’t argue with that majority opinion from actual users.

It is not a magic bullet. It requires imagination and perseverance to make it jump thru hoops so to speak.  However, it is an enabling suite of tools.

It is important to take baby steps, take pride in small accomplishments, and to persevere.

————
FUN!

I really think its FUN to use and create with. Its a joy if you like experiment, solve  puzzles, and come up with solutions to your creative dilemmas.

————
ACTION!

If at some point during these ongoing tutorials you find your interested peeked enough to take action in acquiring or at least investigating into an Artiste product offering as part of your creative compliment then send me an IM or notecard conveying your interest and/or concerns.

==========

 

Do You Wanna Dance?

NOTE: This is a re-publication of an article I wrote for an in-world magazine. 

Interested in performing in dance shows in Second Life? For those new to the performance dance scene in SL, figuring out where to get started can be confusing and frustrating. Or perhaps you have a dance HUD, but have wondered whether another HUD would be better?

Every dancer has his/her own personal favorite, and there are a variety of options available. After a quick search on Marketplace, I found over 1000 listings for dance HUDs. Some are specialized for certain uses, like cheerleading HUDs.

There are some dance HUDs that have become popular with performance dancers, including the HUDDLES EZ Animator Deluxe, the Barre, the SpotOn Performance Director, and the Artiste HUD. Each HUD has different capabilities, so find one that seems to be the best fit for you and what you want to do.

HUDDLES

The HUDDLES EZ Animator Deluxe has long been the most popular dance HUD in Second Life. In fact, it won an AviChoice award for Favorite Dance Choreography Tool in 2015. The HUDDLES has many attractive features, including dancing multiple dancers, chatting emotes and/or commands, a built-in AO, and the ability to do sequenced choreography.

There is no longer an in-world store for the HUDDLES, but you can still purchase it via the Marketplace for $1499L. The HUDDLES is fairly straightforward to use and there are still many dancers who use the HUDDLES, so finding someone familiar with it shouldn’t be difficult.

Barre

The Barre HUD was developed after the HUDDLES, using feedback from performance dancers. The Barre also has the ability to dance multiple dancers, chat emotes and commands, and the ability to do sequenced choreography. However, the Barre introduced the ability to do ‘group’ dancing – where different groups of dancers could do different choreography sequences. Though the ability to do group dancing was cutting-edge, the macros required were rather technical.

The Barre also no longer has an in-world store, but it is available via the Marketplace for $1200L. There is a support group in-world you can join for assistance. Racheal Young, the creator of the Barre, announced on her blog in February of this year that she was leaving Second Life and releasing the Barre to be open-source.

Since the HUDDLES and the Barre, there have been many advances and changes in the world of performance dancing. Instead of ‘stand-alone’ dance HUDs, what we are seeing now are ‘suites’ of products made to work together.

SpotOn

SpotOn released their Choreography Design System and gave performance dancers the ability to plan out routes to move their avatars around the stage. The system was immediately popular and is used by most dance performers. The Choreography Design system is not a dance HUD, but made to be used in conjunction with a dance HUD. Most any dance HUD can be used with the SpotOn mover system.

The SpotOn Choreography Designer is available via their in-world store (where you can demo all their products) as well as on Marketplace for $1999L. SpotOn has continued to release additional products, including the Group Formation System ($1999L), the Performance Director HUD ($999L), the Costume Assistant ($499L), the Smooth Dancer HUD ($999L), and the Stage Manager ($999L). It’s not necessary to buy every product, of course, but since the suite of products all work seamlessly together, it’s easy to buy the pieces that you need.

The Group Formation System is a product that lets you control the formations of your dancers, either using a pre-configured sequence or changing them ‘on the fly.’ SpotOn has two dance HUDs, the Smooth Dancer HUD and the Performance Director HUD. There is a comparison on their website of the two HUDs. The Costume Assistant, through the use of RLV, lets you add/remove costumes and/or attachments from yourself or other dancers (if they also own the Costume Assistant). The Stage Manager is their newest product and is a set rezzer that has the ability to remember multiple stage configurations.

The Artiste

The Artiste HUD is another suite of products that come bundled together. Included in the Artiste GOLD Performer Series are the following: the Artiste GOLD Dance HUD, the Palette, the Set Rezzer, the Director, the Stage Sight (a directed camera HUD), the Stage HUD, the Dance Diva (a group formation system), the Follower Relay (for use with the Dance Diva), and the Message Board. Everything is included in one package for $25000L and is available for purchase from the creator, Lat ‘Yummy’ Lovenkraft.

The Artiste suite of products includes a mover (the Palette), the dance HUD, the ability to do group dancing, a group formation system, and the ability (through the use of RLV) to add/remove costumes and/or attachments directly through the HUD. The Artiste Palette also has other abilities beyond its use as a mover, including the ability to shrink/grow, shatter, oscillate, flash, collide, and throw. The Artiste Rezzer has the ability to rez multiple sets at once and crossfade them, as well as using no copy/no mod items in a set.

Comparison

The big question, of course, is which system is best? The short answer is – it depends. All the HUDs have their pros and cons, and each dancer has his/her own preferences when it comes to HUDs and performing. Some prefer to feel ‘in control’ and have multiple HUDs for different pieces of their performances. Other dancers prefer to be able to have everything controlled by one HUD. Before purchasing a HUD, try out a demo if possible and/or ask others who have used the HUD.

The long answer would take up more space than I could cover in one article, unfortunately. There was an in-depth HUD comparison done by Nottoo Wise (founder of Dance Queens) and the information is still available on the DQ blog. The comparison, however, was done before the release of the SpotOn and Artiste products.

As stated previously, each dance HUD (mentioned here or not) has its own pros and cons. The best way to decide which one you like is to try them yourself. However, that isn’t always possible (or affordable). I have personally used each of the four HUDs in performances, so I do have experience with all of them. One of the biggest questions users have is how easy it is to learn to use the HUD.

For the HUDDLES and Barre, there are still a large number of users (or people like me who have previously used the HUD), so it may not be difficult to find help. However, neither HUDDLES nor Barre offer much customer support. There are support groups in-world, but generally consist of users helping each other. The Barre creator has ceased customer support, and I could not locate any customer support for the HUDDLES. (The person listed on the creator’s profile for support is apparently no longer in SL.)

Neither HUD is particularly difficult to use, though the macros needed for group dancing with the Barre can be confusing. But for ‘wear and go’ use, any of the dance HUDs covered here work well.

Ease of use applies when learning the more advanced features of the HUDs, particularly with the Artiste suite of products. It simply does so many different things that there is a fairly steep learning curve. However, both SpotOn and the Artiste offer ongoing customer support, including one-on-one help.

One other consideration is how the HUD performs under laggy conditions. Every creator has done their best to make sure that their HUDs are as low-lag as possible. However, given the multitude of variables during performances (including the many different computer/viewer configurations), it is sometimes hard to say which product performs better.

I have tried to come up with a short list to compare some of the major features of the HUDs mentioned here. This, of course, does not cover all the features of the different HUDs, but is offered solely as a means of comparing some of the more pertinent features.

HUD Table

*Price reflects the entire suite of products

+The ability to dance groups using different dance sequences

~The ability to ‘layer’ animations in order to use only parts of animations in a sequence

This has been a brief overview of some of the more popular dance HUDs in Second Life. There are so many features and capabilities that it isn’t possible to compare them all in depth here. Decide what features are ‘must-haves’ and find a HUD that works for you. Any of the HUDs discussed here work for performance dancing, so experiment and have fun!

EDIT 11/10/2015:  Rachael Young, creator of the Barre, has announced recently that it will not be released open-source and is again under development.

SpotOn Stage Manager

SpotOn SMI’ve finally had a chance to unpack and try out the new Stage Manager from SpotOn.

I must say, it has some pretty nifty features.

I already own several rez boxes, so I was curious to see what new things I could do with it.

I’ve used a rez-faux rezzer (not my favorite), and I have the Multi-Scene rezzer, which I love.

I also have the Artiste rezzer, but I think that one I will do a separate review for, as it has a lot of very cool integrated features.

My curiosity about the SpotOn Stage Manager was piqued when I saw that you could use it at multiple venues (because it remembers the stage) and that you could rez it anywhere at your venue and it would still set up the build correctly.

The Old Way

Let me discuss for a minute how rezzing sets used to happen (and still does, in many cases).

Before there were rezzers, you would build your set at your home or building platform.

You would then pick it up as one coalesced object and then go to the performance venue.

Once there, you would rez the set, get it positioned correctly, and then pick it up.

You would then be able to use the ‘restore to last position’ feature to rez your set on the day of performance.

Some issues with this method is that ‘restore to last’ is not always available to use.

Also, depending on the items contained in your set build, linking it all together was not always possible or practical.

Rezzers Developed

When rezzers became available, they were widely adopted by performers.

Rezzers let you build your set elsewhere, pack everything into the rezzer, and then take the rezzer (with the set within it) to the performance venue.

In order to use a rezzer, all the items within it must have copy/mod permissions.

So no-copy items will not work with most rezzers.

Even though rezzers made some things easier, there were/are still issues.

With most rezzers, the position of the rezzer itself matters.

So often, you would go to the performance venue, rez the rez box, and then end up having to move the rez box around in order to get the set positioned correctly.

Maybe the venue prefers that the rezzers all be backstage or under the stage, so you would need to move it around to accommodate that desire.

There are ways around this issue, but it was/is still extra work.

With most rezzers, you will have a separate rezzer for each venue, because one set will not generally fit well on the stage at multiple venues (since the stages are usually different sizes).

SpotOn Stage Manager Benefits

SpotOn’s Stage Manager has similarities to other rezzers.

You can only rez one set at a time.

You can only use copy/mod items in your set builds.

SpotOn SM PersonalizedIt’s possible to personalize the Stage Manager – you can change the color (only to colors specified) and you can add a picture.

This is my personalized SM – I’ve changed the color to blue and added a photo so others know it’s my SM.

The biggest benefit of the SpotOn Stage Manager is that you can set it up to remember multiple stages.

Since many dancers perform at multiple venues, this is a great time saver.

You have a to do a bit of front-end work by going to each venue and setting up the rezzer to recognize each place.

The other big bonus with this rezzer is that where you rez/place the Stage Manager doesn’t matter.

Regardless of where you place the rezzer, your set will rez correctly.

Another small benefit is that with the Stage Manager, you don’t see objects rezzing out the audience and then disappearing as they snap into place.

SpotOn Stage Manager Differences

I did discover a few differences when using the Stage Manager versus using my Multi-Scene rezzer.

With the Multi-Scene, if I need to move something in my set build, I can reposition the object, and then ‘save back to object contents,’ and it will update the position of the object.

So the next time I rez the set, the change will be remembered.

Using the Stage Manager, you can’t save back to object contents.

You will have to reposition the object, get the notecard from the SM again, and then update the set notecard to reflect your change.

With the Multi-Scene rezzer, I could edit the rezzer box itself and reposition my set by moving the rez box.

Since the Stage Manager position is independent of the set position, you cannot do this with the Stage Manager.

Final Thoughts

I like the Stage Manager.

For me, the biggest benefit is being able to place it anywhere at a venue and have my stage rez correctly.

That said, setting it up can be somewhat tricky.

I’ve used it at two different venues successfully.

I set it up for a third venue, and for some reason, my set keeps rezzing too low.

I got the coordinates again, but it still didn’t work correctly.

I plan to revisit it again today, and hopefully I can figure out what I did wrong. :/

It’s also nice to be able to rez your sets and clear the stage via chat commands.

I set up buttons on my Performance Director HUD to rez and clear my set for an act.

There are a few things I wish it did (as well as other rezzers).

The Stage Manager does glow at the bottom to indicate that you have a set rezzed.

I would love to get some kind of chat notice that it was done rezzing my set and also when the stage was cleared.

The stage seems to clear almost instantly, so that may not be necessary, but some venues have performers waiting in green rooms, and it can be difficult to cam around to see if your set is done rezzing.

The Stage Manager is made to work seamlessly with other SpotOn products, so if you already own other products, you know they will all play nicely together. 🙂

You can purchase the Stage Manager at the SpotOn in-world store, or you can purchase it on Marketplace for $999L.

Spot On Stage Manager

I came across this video in my Google feed.

SpotOn Stage Manager

The new set rezzer/stage manager from SpotOn has a couple of features I thought were cool.

I like the ability for it to remember more than one stage – if you are a performer who does acts at more than one venue, that alone will be a huge timesaver.

I also like that the position/location of where you put the rezzer/manager doesn’t matter (unless I misunderstood the video).

For locations where you can’t ‘restore to last,’ trying to figure out where to put the rezzer can be a headache.

And then you have to move the rezzer and your set around until you have it placed correctly.

You can already include your movers as part of your set with other rezzers, though personally, I don’t like doing that.

With most rez boxes (including this one, from what I could tell), you can only rez one set at a time.

So if you like to rez your movers ahead of time in order to cache dances and get everyone in place, that’s not possible if you include them as part of your set.

I have seen some dancers use two rez boxes, one for sets and one for movers.

I’m not sure exactly when this will be available or what it will cost.

But it’s another option for those of us who perform.

Breakthrough!

Image Source: lornawellness.com
Image Source: lornawellness.com

On Day 17 of my adventures with the Artiste HUD (17 has always been a lucky number for me), I had a breakthrough.

I had been fussing and futzing and fighting with the stupid curtain fade.

I wanted the curtain to fade, then my other object, and then my other events to start happening.  I couldn’t seem to get the curtain to fade fast enough.  I would have just changed the fade script to make it fade faster, but the curtain was no-mod.  So, what to do?

I began playing with the timings of event 0, trying to make it last longer, so the curtain would fade out completely before the next event happened.

I made it bigger.  I made it smaller.

Nothing worked.

And then, I remembered something from the manuals.

When you use an event 0, it causes an anomaly with the timing.  Whatever the time of your event 0 is (say 2 secs) then 2 times your event duration (2 secs) is the amount (which would be 4 secs here) your timings will be off for the rest of your events.

AHA!

So because I was using an event 0, and my next event (#1) was only 2 secs long, I was confusing the poor HUD.  Because my event 0 lasted for 2 secs, my timings would be off by 4 secs for the rest of the events.  With event 1 only being 2 secs long, no wonder things weren’t happening in the order I wanted them to!

I felt like I was on the verge of finally understanding how all these different pieces fit together.  Ever cautious, I sent a message to Yummy to clarify that I understood how events fired.  So that would mean with an event #1 of 2 secs, and an event #2 of 3 secs, I press play, 2 secs later event #1 fires, and 3 secs after that (5 secs after pressing play), my event #2 would fire.

She verified that my understanding was correct.

Eureka!

So, with my new-found understanding, I deleted my pesky event #0.  I realized that I had been constrained because of the way all other systems work in SL.

Normally, when you design a routine, you base everything off your audio cue – the start of the music.  You press play when the music starts, and everything needs to fall into place from there.

However, because I can choose when to start the music by playing it through the Director, I didn’t have that constraint anymore.

With no need for an event #0, I reworked my events timeline.  The curtain fade would be the first event, then my second fade, then my other actions would follow.

After making all the changes, I reset my palettes and my HUD.

With baited breath, I pressed play and waited to see what would happen.

IT WORKED!!!!!

Everything happened in the order I wanted it to, and the pesky curtain faded out completely prior to everything else.

I was so elated! I felt as though I had had a major breakthrough, and certain that I now had a firm grasp of how everything worked, I immediately began working on the rest of the routine.

The failure and the frustrations of Day 16 melted away and I was energized and excited to not only finish this routine, but to start working on more!

Days 11-16 with the Artiste

Image Source:  www.eventective.com
Image Source: http://www.eventective.com

This will be my last post about my first days with the Artiste.

I’ve learned a ton, but there are still hundreds of features I haven’t even touched on yet.

I hope to be posting some videos in the coming weeks to demonstrate what I’ve accomplished so far and what I hope to accomplish as time goes on.

Day 12:

I learned how to use the Director to control the curtain.  Also learned how to add the command into my autofx nc.  Decided to make an event 0 so I can fade the curtain at the beginning of the routine.  When you use an event 0, you also have to turn on AutoPrePostAutoFx in the *config nc.

Again, ran out of time to do much else.

Days 13 and 14:

I was so busy with various projects that when I snuck a few moments to work with the Artiste, I forgot to keep notes.  Sigh.

Day 15:

After realizing I forgot to keep any notes from the previous days, I sat down to try and remember all the stuff I learned.  I started working on another routine after scrapping my original idea.  I need to fade another object at the beginning of the routine, so put that fade and the curtain on event 0.  Because I added an event 0, I changed SeqOnPlay from 1 to 0 so the sequence won’t start immediately when I press play.

The routine I am working on is a duet, so I need to have each dancer doing a separate sequence.  I read through the grouping manual and figured out what command I needed on the autofx to make each dancer dance a different sequence.  The only mistake I made was to leave the number of dancers at 6, because I had the division set as HALF.  So in that case, 3 dancers do sequence A, 3 dancers do sequence B.  So I need ALT as the division with only 2 dancers.

Started discussing with Yummy things I could ‘add’ to the routine.  I wanted to add some lighting and had tried making a few lights with some palettes.  However, I ended up frustrated because it wouldn’t stay the color I was setting it to, and I couldn’t figure out why.  Turns out there is a default color setting parameter in the palette nc – once I changed that to ‘none,’ it worked perfectly.

I had also tried to make smoke using the palette’s built-in function.  I couldn’t get it to work.  After talking to Yummy, there was a problem in the code somewhere, so she found it and fixed it.  An updated palette later – voilá – smoke.  🙂  After reading through the updated manual, I also discovered that I could use one palette for both fire and smoke.  The fire is an animated texture (also built-in to the palette), and the smoke is a particle effect, so I can do both with only one palette.  Nifty!

When I couldn’t get the built-in smoke effect to work, I decided to make some myself.  Part of the Performer Series is a coupon for a free particle generator.  I have tried several, but this one is pretty easy to use/learn.  It also has a few ready-to-go effects, including smoke.  So I got the script, and dropped it in the palette (I deleted the 11-01B particle script in the palette, because it’s no-mod, and substituted my script).  Did the same thing with a fire particle effect, and added the start/stop commands to my autofx.

I tried to show Yummy what I was trying to do, but I couldn’t get the particle effects to fire.  Apparently there was a another bug, so she headed off to fix that.

I decided to go back to the palette manual and see what other ‘tricks’ I could add to the routine.  Decided to add in a ‘tip’ it.  I still need to go back and work on the events timing, because everything isn’t gelling the way I want it to.  The curtain is a slow fade, and other things are happening before it completely fades out, which isn’t what I want.

Day 16:

Today was a very frustrating day.  I added in my ‘tip’ command.  For some reason, it tipped me 180 degrees instead of 90.  So, I reset the palettes, and it worked fine.  I decided to try and film some short, quick, how-to videos on using the palettes to make smoke and fire.  I was filming on a platform and kept getting a weird script error.  Turns out it was because I had the anchor rezzed below – it was trying to let me know the palettes were too far away.  Doh!

Got the smoke video made.  Tried to film the fire one, but was having no luck.  So Yummy came to trouble-shoot.  While she was doing that, I decided to work on the routine again.  After about 20 failed attempts to get the curtain to fade, I am ready to pull my hair out and throw the HUD across the room.

Yummy to the rescue – again.  She realized that I had a problem with my events.  After reviewing my events and autofx, discovered I was giving the HUD conflicting commands.  So I deleted one of the commands and tried again.

No curtain fade.

It worked yesterday, what I have done since then to screw it up?  Then Yummy asked if I was logged into the Director.  Sigh.

No.  So, I logged into the Director and crossed my fingers it would work this time.

Nope.

I was getting so frustrated, so Yummy said to give her some time to see if there was a bug.  After a day of failures, I decided to log out and work on other projects.

However, I was determined to figure it out, so I logged back in several hours later to try again.  Yummy had left a message that she had found the problem and was working on a fix.  I will need an updated HUD, so I will wait until tomorrow.  I am going to get this!!

Days 7-11

Image Source: www.facebook.com
Image Source: http://www.facebook.com

Okay, it probably seems crazy to lump that many days together.  Unfortunately, that pesky thing called RL kept me from accomplishing as much as I wanted for several days.

On Day 7, I was still trying to work out emotes/emoting.  I tried using the adhoc method first, using the dialog boxes to enter my emotes, and things seemed to work just fine.

I went back through the manual again, just to refresh my memory.  The HUD will always use the MaxGroups Override value if it is NOT zero and it is less than the MaxGroups value.  You can adjust the emote lead-time with the HUD menu – [EXTRAS]>[AutoTiming]>EmoteLead.  Then use increase/decrease to adjust the lead time.  Remember the 5/6 (or 1/2, 2/3, 3/4, etc) rule!  Lead time MUST be smaller than the smallest event time.  (You can set the lead time to zero.) If you want to skip an emote for an event, simply enter one space on that emote line.

You can change the max # of events in 2 ways – using the HUD menu to change the maxgroupsoverride, or changing that parameter in the *config nc.  You can have the HUD send the emotes directly to local chat, or send to you (it says it sends to your IM box, but it just displayed mine in local chat to owner only).  [AUTOS]>SendtoIM or SendToChat.  If you use the *config nc, you can also change the channel for the chat relay, as well as shout/say, and the send to IM/send to open chat on/off.

Announcements – these are similar to emotes, only they are meant to be sent over their own channel to display text in a different context.  (Examples – announcer, MC, narrator, bubble chat, etc.)  Announcements can be entered via nc for via the HUD.  You simply create a regular emote-detail set and assign its name to AutoAnnounceTitle, set an AutoAnnounceLeadTime, and switch AutoAnnounce to on.  You can set the channel as well so it matches the receiving object (like the message board).  Change the parameters in the *config nc.

The message board (which is now part of the Performer’s Series) lets you send lines of text up to 48 characters long.  Default channel is 8 – it only listens to the owner or object owned by the owner.  Up to 4 lines at a time can be displayed.  Entering a 5 tells the board to ‘clear’ itself.

Line format: EventNo,LineNo,%Text        Example: 1,1%Hello. How are you?

To select an emote and make it an announcement – [EXTRAS]>[RELOAD]>EmoteDetails>Announce.  Select the emote detail set you want, if you need to change the active set, then change mode to Announce.

In order to use emotes, it’s often advisable to use a lead-time.  There are also lead times for AutoAdorn, AutoFX, AutoRex, and AutoPose.  All lead times MUST be less than or equal to the specific or calculated interval and less than or equal to the smallest custom interval.

Lead time is the number of seconds before, not after, that an action takes place prior to the actual event time.  An event time marks the time that an item (or group of items) is removed/stripped.  You can specify ‘none’ for a given strip round.  You can also disable AutoStrip, but the events will still fire as if it was enabled.  You should get an error if the lead time rule is not obeyed.

So after reading through everything, I tried my hand at an emote nc.  I created a nc titled *lamentemotes.  I loaded it into the HUD, added it to the emotetitles nc, changed the timing of the events to 5 secs, added an event #4, then reset the HUD.  Let’s see what happens. 🙂

Well, it fired the first emote.  I thought the lead times were wrong, but the lead times are set to zero for emotes, so I can’t figure out why the rest of the emotes are not firing.  I didn’t have an emote for event #2, so I had used the blank space like the instructions said.  I deleted that line and reset the HUD to see if that was the problem.

Grrr.  It’s still only firing the first emote.  Added an END command to the end of the emotes.  Chat from the HUD shows that it is still reading the *emRedDemo emote nc, so I’m not sure what’s going on.  After I reset the HUD, the chat showed it read the *lamentemotes nc, so maybe I just needed to do the reset.

Nope.  Still just showing the first emote.

At this point, I ran out of time and decided to come back the next day and see if I could figure it out.

So, now it’s Day 8.

I still can’t get the emotes to fire correctly.  I looked at the maxgroupsoverride, maxgroups, events, and orders01.  Everything seems fine.  I did increase the maxgroups from 3 to 20 and did the same for maxgroups override, just to be safe.  Still doesn’t work.

Then I realized I had the events set up wrong.  I had them all listed at 5 secs (duration) rather than as a timeline (elapsed).  I changed the events to 2, 5, 10, and 15 instead of 2, 5, 5, 5 and it worked perfectly.  Yay!!!

Yummy has a new version with fixes/improvements and some new pieces in it, so I will be getting that all organized later.  She wants to show me how to use my HUD to play the song, rather than through a stream.  I don’t understand how that’s going to work, so it should be interesting. 🙂

Got the new box of stuff and got everything set up so I could try to play the music through the HUD.  We had some initial issues with getting the Director set up and getting it to recognize me.  A little frustrating, but we eventually got it working.

Ran out of time again, so on to Day 9!

On Day 9, I didn’t have time to do diddly squat with the HUD.  😦

Day 10 dawned, and I decided to scrap the idea I’d been working with as a routine, because I’d hit a wall.  Played around with a few ideas, and decided on one.  Yummy wants some help with the Dance Diva stuff she is working on (just to be a ball-sitter, really – except she says there are no balls, so I’m not really sure what I’ll be doing, lol).  After reading a little bit of the manual about the Dance Diva, I realized I needed to make some of the old sequences I’d been planning to use into separate nc’s to use with the HUD.  Decided to get up bright and early on Day 11, because the rest of Day 10 was spent on that darn RL stuff again!

Day 11 – well, you know what they say about the best laid plans.  I had no time at all on Day 11 to work with the HUD.

Big sigh of disappointment.  😦