The Power of ‘Like’

Power of Like
Image Source: socialprchat.com

Yesterday I wrote about feeling overwhelmed with all the information available today.

But I’m also a blog addict.

Well, saying I’m reading addict would be more accurate, I suppose.

I love to read, and I love to learn new things.

I also love to share what I learn, hence this blog. 😀

But when you are starting out as a new blogger (something I’ve done multiple times), it can be hard to motivate yourself to keep going.

You feel like you are in the middle of a crowded room, talking – but no one is listening.

Part of the appeal of blogging for me is the discussion that my writing (hopefully) generates.

So having someone comment on something I wrote makes my day. (Truly!)

‘Likes’ and ‘shares’ and ‘pingbacks’ are also appreciated.

But how many of us actually do those simple things?

I Blame Facebook

If you’re a regular reader of my blog, you know how I feel about Facebook.  -.-

However, over and above their shameless selling of our data for their profit, they did introduce the ‘like’ to most people.

We now find ‘like’ buttons everywhere.

‘Like,’ ‘favorite,’ upvote – whatever term a site uses, they’ve got a button for it.

These buttons have become so ubiquitous that most people don’t even notice them (or, apparently, use them) anymore.

Has ‘liking’ something become unfashionable now?

Take Back the ‘Like’

If you read blogs (like this one), do the authors a HUGE favor and every once in a while, press that little ‘like’ or ‘share’ button.

I have a friend who recently started blogging and is, like most bloggers, hoping for some feedback.

Whether it’s a like or comment, all he wants is some feedback.

I’m not sure why people don’t ‘like’ things the way they used to.

Now, I’m not suggesting that you give people ‘pity’ likes.

No one wants that.

But if you genuinely ‘like’ something that someone wrote, let them know.

If you have something to say about something they wrote (or took a picture of, or whatever), let them know – positive or negative.

For example, I have a Flickr account.

I check every day to see what fabulous photos people have taken.

But I very rarely ‘favorite’ any of them.

Why?

Because it’s too much effort to push that button?

Because I don’t want them to get a swelled head from my ‘favorite’?

Or is it because we don’t really know what we ‘like’ anymore?

My Challenge

My challenge – to you and to myself – is to take a few moments this week and push that little button.

Only if it’s something that you truly like, of course.

Surely over the course of a week, you come across at least a few things you like, right?

I’m challenging myself to like and/or comment on blogs.

It’s kind of hypocritical to complain that no one likes/comments on your blog, if you never do it either.

I’m also challenging myself to ‘favorite’ pics on Flickr.

There’s almost always a picture that makes me stop for a moment – so I take that moment to ‘favorite’ it.

I know how great I feel when I get a like, a favorite, a comment – whatever.

So if I can share that feeling by liking others’ work, I do.

I challenge you to do the same. 😀

(P.S. For those of you who have liked/commented/shared anything I’ve written – THANK YOU!!)

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11 thoughts on “The Power of ‘Like’

  1. Well darn, Kat. I tried to Like – and word press wanted me to log in – which I don’t believe I ever have before. And they don’t like password I don’t think I ever set up with them. But I do LIKE!!!!

    1. I told you that Blogger and WordPress don’t play well together!!! 😛 I usually end up using my Google profile to comment on Blogger blogs, but you raise a good point. Shouldn’t it be easier to like/favorite/share, regardless of what platform is being used? I think so. 😀

    1. While I don’t blog solely because I am after likes/favorites/shares, I DO appreciate someone taking the time to do so. And if liking/favoriting something gives that person a little lift, I’m all for that. 🙂

  2. Kat, I always enjoy your thoughts and only regret that I didn’t start commenting on your blog sooner. (I’m weird like that; I’ve always felt that if I didn’t have a blog of my own to put in the little “website” box on comment forms, that my commentary might be somehow unwelcome or seen as lesser-than. Quirky misconceptions like that so silly in the grand scheme of things!)

    You’re so right about the wonderful sense of comaraderie that comes from engaging with your social media connections, your own readers, and the writers or photographers whose words/imagery you enjoy. Personally, I could (and totally have) spend all day reading blogs and engaging; it constantly makes me wish for more hours in the day. Now that I’m on Twitter, Flickr and looking into Google+ and Facebook, the sheer amount of engaging that could take up the hours seems overwhelming, but not at all unwelcome. One of those things where we have to figure out how to balance being “connected” and learning when it’s time to step away.

    Where Flickr is concerned, I’ve taken to giving favorites to photos of places that I want to visit, primarily if they include SLURLs or location details. Otherwise I’ll leave a comment and/or follow the person’s account. That site has been a tricky one to crack, as it’s not very intuitive to navigate or aggregate content, but the photos people share are amazing and well worth the trouble!

    Thank you for making me ruminate on this (sheesh, practically writing a blog here in your comments!) and for sharing your thoughts on these tokens of engagement. Whilst I enjoyed reading Becky’s post for SL Blogger Support and agree with her points, I’m totally with you on the giddy bit of joy that comes from some liking, linking to, or commenting on your share. It helps to foster that sense of community that’s so vital to SL, and it would be a very sad day indeed if these tokens of appreciation and engagement ever die out!

    1. I agree, Flickr is not intuitive at all. Is there a way to view recent photos from my groups as a stream? Or must I go to each group individually? I do like the large SL community, and I have made an effort over the last week or so to favorite photos I like. Knowing what social media to use and time management are huge issues. I’m currently on Google+, Twitter, Flickr, and ASN, and finding it difficult to keep up with just those!! I do love Feedly, which makes it much easier to scan through blogs and see what’s happening. 🙂

      1. Re: a better way to surf Flickr groups – there is! Has to do with feeding them (pun intended) through Feedly or another RSS reader. The functionality may be going away when they forcibly switch people over the new groups mode though, which is currently in Beta. But I was planning to write a post about it – thank you for the reminder! 🙂

        Are you enjoying using ASN? That’s another one on my list to check out. So many out there, so little time!

        1. Argh – I was researching that a bit yesterday and I did add a ‘feed’ for Flickr to my Feedly, but I will undoubtedly miss things. 😦 And they are changing Flickr again?! I swear, I learn how to use something and they change it all up on me, darn it!
          I do enjoy ASN – the community there is very friendly and it’s growing every day. I mostly interact with SL’ers, but there are other VW’s there as well, so it’s nice to see what’s going on in other worlds. I just added ASN’s mobile app to my phone and so far, I’m liking it. :))

  3. Oh gosh, I know those feels. I’m just kinda-sorta getting the swing of things with Flickr, but there are certain Beta features that will be forcibly rolled out before long. Probably why I’m resisting figuring out Google+ already. I wish every social media site functioned in exactly the same way so I could keep track! 😉

    Speaking of social media sites, really great to hear a positive review of ASN. I’ve seen it mentioned a few times at other sites, but people seemed to be kind of “meh” about it. (Or maybe I’m thinking of one of the other avatar networks that died off – there have been soooo many.) Will definitely check it out on your recommendation, thanks Kat!

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